Commissioning A Liturgical Artist

The Cathedral of St Stephen in Brisbane holds the best collection of the work of Australian sculptor, John Elliott (1943-2016).  Nowhere else are there three major works together.  The cathedral has the shrine of Virgin Mary, the altar crucifix and the diocesan shrine of patron St Mary MacKillop.  John Elliott was born in Canterbury, England, studied at the Royal College of Art in London, and migrated to Australia in 1970.  He taught sculpture at the Queensland College of Art. Continue reading “Commissioning A Liturgical Artist”

Pauline Clayton Sculptor (10 July 1944 — 3 October 2012)

Pauline Clayton worked as a sculptor in Melbourne and her works are featured in various institutions, including St Francis’ Church, Lonsdale Street, and schools, including Catholic Ladies College, Eltham. In addition to juggling the responsibilities of marriage, helping to raise three children and teaching, Pauline undertook art classes at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT) and taught art and sculpture in secondary schools, including Geoghegan College, Broadmeadows and Genazzano fcj College, Kew, VIC. Continue reading “Pauline Clayton Sculptor (10 July 1944 — 3 October 2012)”

Leopoldine Mimovich – Immigrant Artist

In the aftermath of World War II thousands of displaced persons from Europe sought a new home in Australia. They came bringing a diverse array of talents to the arts thus contributing to a new and unique artistic sensibility in this country. In time, a flourishing of art, literature, drama and music emerged. One of these immigrant artists was the young sculptor Leopoldine Mimovich. Continue reading “Leopoldine Mimovich – Immigrant Artist”

1930’s RELIGIOUS SCULPTURE OF DAPHNE MAYO

Daphne Mayo

DAPHNE MAYO caused a sensation in 1927 when she sculpted the tympanum of Brisbane’s City Hall. The conservative city fathers were astonished by the sight of this diminutive 32 year old woman wielding a jackhammer in the hot sun high above the streets. The work made her reputation and introduced the most productive decade of her life as a sculptor. Besides the women’s war memorial in Anzac Square and other commissions, she undertook a number of religious works which are an important part of the patrimony of the Australian Church.

Continue reading “1930’s RELIGIOUS SCULPTURE OF DAPHNE MAYO”