Commissioning A Liturgical Artist

The Cathedral of St Stephen in Brisbane holds the best collection of the work of Australian sculptor, John Elliott (1943-2016).  Nowhere else are there three major works together.  The cathedral has the shrine of Virgin Mary, the altar crucifix and the diocesan shrine of patron St Mary MacKillop.  John Elliott was born in Canterbury, England, studied at the Royal College of Art in London, and migrated to Australia in 1970.  He taught sculpture at the Queensland College of Art. Continue reading “Commissioning A Liturgical Artist”

Pauline Clayton Sculptor (10 July 1944 — 3 October 2012)

Pauline Clayton worked as a sculptor in Melbourne and her works are featured in various institutions, including St Francis’ Church, Lonsdale Street, and schools, including Catholic Ladies College, Eltham. In addition to juggling the responsibilities of marriage, helping to raise three children and teaching, Pauline undertook art classes at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT) and taught art and sculpture in secondary schools, including Geoghegan College, Broadmeadows and Genazzano fcj College, Kew, VIC. Continue reading “Pauline Clayton Sculptor (10 July 1944 — 3 October 2012)”

Leopoldine Mimovich – Immigrant Artist

In the aftermath of World War II thousands of displaced persons from Europe sought a new home in Australia. They came bringing a diverse array of talents to the arts thus contributing to a new and unique artistic sensibility in this country. In time, a flourishing of art, literature, drama and music emerged. One of these immigrant artists was the young sculptor Leopoldine Mimovich. Continue reading “Leopoldine Mimovich – Immigrant Artist”

Translucence of Light

The inspiration of St Francis Xavier Cathedral in Geraldton, Western Australia, considered by some as one of the finest cathedrals built in the 20th century[i], can be found in the Arts and Crafts Movement of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Among the principles of the Arts Crafts Movement is engagement of local builders, artists and crafts persons in the construction and decoration of buildings and the use of vernacular materials. Continue reading “Translucence of Light”

L. Peter Kollar: Architect and Revered Educator (1926-2000)

As a refugee from political suppression in his native Hungary, in 1949 a young architect escaped by making his way through the snows of the European winter camouflaged in a white sheet. After a long and arduous journey, he eventually arrived in Australia where he was to become one of the most influential identities in Australian architecture. Continue reading “L. Peter Kollar: Architect and Revered Educator (1926-2000)”

Natasha – a personal reflection

Natasha by G.W.Bot (detail)
Natasha (detail) – click for full view

When first saw this piece in the early 90s, I was also exploring the Catholic faith. The imagery of an icon was immediately recognisable and arresting. The simplicity of rendering in apparent monotone and the animation of the child I found appealing. It represented for me a gentle welcome into a faith community that has since become my spiritual home. It also became a vehicle for a line of enquiry into my place in the Church and that of women in general. Continue reading “Natasha – a personal reflection”

BOOK REVIEW: Richard Vosko, Art and Architecture for Congregational Worship: The Search for a Common Ground

(Collegeville, Liturgical Press, 2019) 236 pages.

Richard Vosko was in Australia in February 2019 as keynote speaker at the National Liturgical Architecture and Art Council’s symposium Where Your Treasure Is, There Will Your Heart Be Also: Catholic Liturgical Heritage.  Those who met him there will be keen to read this development of his input.  Those who did not meet him have the opportunity to make his acquaintance through this book. Continue reading “BOOK REVIEW: Richard Vosko, Art and Architecture for Congregational Worship: The Search for a Common Ground”